Everybody Isn’t Doing It- The Reblog

You all know that excuse, you  all have heard it. You’re cruising along through some online discussion about this or that and what authors shouldn’t do to promote their books when, BOOM, some fool drops those words your mother hated to hear, “But everybody’s doing it!”

It could be about rather important but honest things like not getting a professional editor but it’s usually about such things as buying reviews or spamming discussions. I swear the post actually whines.Everybody does it.  How can I get noticed and sell my book(s) if I don’t? Everybody does it. (You can hear the whine, right?)

Got news for you, cupcake, not everybody does it. Why? It’s simple really, some people are just honest and believe that hard work and talent will eventually bring them the rewards of their labor, some just believe in following the rules and searching for acceptable ways to get notice, and some are scared of getting caught.

Because getting caught brings about a special kind of attention. Sure, you may get some sales and “pity” reviews because there are always those who seem to think that people are being mean to you when they express their displeasure for your actions by writing about it or giving your book a negative review.

“It isn’t about the book,” they protest, but it really is.  Every act of lying, scamming, cheating to get your book noticed is exactly about the book and  the author. You may have written the Great American Novel, probably not because most writers in this group seem to barely rise above mediocre,  but you have also shown your naked butt in public and it is not a pretty sight. You are not to be trusted.

You have tried to cheat your potential readers, you have tried to cheat your fellow authors. Why would we want anything to do with you?

For the rest of your career this will follow you like a loyal dog, right there at your heel where everybody can see it. From now on your every action, every review, and in the case of plagiarism, your every book will be scrutinized closely and even if it seems acceptable the doubt will linger.

There will always be those who will support the poor beset author, defending them, trying to minimize their misdeeds like an overly fond parent defending their child when s/he’s caught stealing a car or defending them because they themselves have done something they shouldn’t and are hoping for a little tit for tat when they are caught.

So if you have to defend your actions by claiming everybody’s “doing it” you might want to reconsider those actions because most assuredly everybody is not “doing it” and those are the authors readers, reviewers, and bloggers are going to support.

Ruth Mahala Burlingame

Review- The Lost Cats and Lonely Hearts Club

Screenshot (114)While covering a story, feisty network reporter Madison Shaw gets more than she bargained for when she rescues a box of orphaned kittens. Suddenly the glamazon of the Manhattan news room is doing two am feedings to keep these furbabies alive!

This is certainly a change of pace for the high maintenance workaholic she’s become and taking care of the kittens makes Madison realise how far off track she’s come—after all, she was a stray once too…

When a video of her caring for the kittens goes viral, she knows her image as a hardnosed reporter is shot to hell. What Madison doesn’t expect is the media circus that propels her and the kittens to stardom. And the domino effect that has on her, her career and her love life—especially when she meets sexy Officer Nick Marino!– Amazon

Labor Day is coming up and here is the perfect last beach read of the season. One woman on the wrong road to success and happiness finds the true path by rescuing four stray kittens.

Look, it is what it is- fun, nothing more. A perfect book to pick up, put down, and pick up again. You can see the predictable plot twists coming but that doesn’t make less enjoyable. It’s designed to give you happy, warm fuzzies and it does.

There are bad guys who get what they deserve, the hot, good guy who gets Madison, the best friends who each get a kitten (and  their own books), and Madison who gets everything a book heroine should get.

This is the perfect example of what a 3 star book should be. Read it.

Review- Twistered

Screenshot (113)My name is Dorothy. I live in Kansas. I’ve seen a few tornadoes in my day, but nothing like the one that dropped my dead ex-husband, Wade, on my doorstep in a crushed motor home. Wade looked almost as beat up as the RV when he spilled from the back door, his red sneakers sticking out.

That was just the beginning of a crazy Memorial Day weekend when I won a big contest (complete with cash and a car), was accosted by a studly FBI agent, uncovered an old case of blackmail, discovered my ex-love might still love me, dealt with the Wickeds motorcycle gang, managed the annual charity dog show…and nearly died from a gunshot wound.

I almost had the feeling that I wasn’t in Kansas anymore….– Amazon

I read this book well over a year ago and never got around to a review. For me a cozy mystery is a light, entertaining read and Twistered is precisely that but with a, pardon the expression, twist.

The twist is Wilson’s adept marrying of a modern mystery in a fictional real world setting with the characters, settings, and plot points of the Wizard of Oz book, movie, and actors. She does it brilliantly, at times subtly, at times brashly, and she does it in a way that doesn’t interfere with the flow of the story.

She even manages to include monkeys.

The only problem for me was the ending, I’m picky about my endings, and this one seemed to drag on just a little too long but not enough to ruin the whole experience. An excellent example of what a carefully crafted cosy should be.

Racism, Sue, and Suzan

Hello, Dear Readers, I am trying to get myself back into a blogging frame of mind. Not easy but I’m trying. Today, however, I am reblogging Teach Me Tonight‘s excellent post on the past and present racism of Sue Grimshaw and how she is perceived by people on both sides of the issue.

As Twitter filled with authors and readers wondering what possessed two separate small publishers to hire her as an acquisitions editor,  one, Jack’s House, let her go but the other, Glenfinnan, has doubled down on the insistence that Grimshaw is a Nice White Lady and not at all what so many people have the receipts for.

Glenfinnan’s CEO, Suzan Tisdale, even went live  to give us 12 cringe worthy minutes defending her bestie. This link will get you to the post. THen Teach Me Tonight posted her blog with some history of Grimshaw’s past behavior and a transcript of Tisdale’s defense including screenshots of people’s reactions posted on Twitter.

Racism and the Corporate Romance Buyer: a “little fiasco” involving Sue Grimshaw

There’s been a lot of discussion about readers and publishers and who has the greatest role in blocking the publication of particular books/preventing them becoming a success. There’s also been discussion about how the RWA awards (which can help boost an author’s career) might be shaped by racism and homophobia.

Recently, another type of player has been under discussion: the corporate book buyer. In particular, Sue Grimshaw. In 2007, Grimshaw was interviewed at Dear Author and the importance of her role was explained: Link to post.

The next day Vivanco posted a second piece, Shaping Submissions via Omissionswhich details how Glenfinnan’s submission requirements keeps any sort of diversity out.

Both posts provide a clear picture of the effect of a pattern of behavior that should no longer be socially, ethically, or morally acceptable.